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2 edition of Nutrient limitation and plant and soil microbial growth in an Arctic coastal salt marsh. found in the catalog.

Nutrient limitation and plant and soil microbial growth in an Arctic coastal salt marsh.

Sarah K. Hargreaves

Nutrient limitation and plant and soil microbial growth in an Arctic coastal salt marsh.

by Sarah K. Hargreaves

  • 236 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


About the Edition

In order to assess the nutrient limitation of plants and soil microorganisms in the Arctic coastal salt marsh at La Perouse Bay, Manitoba, a nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilization experiment was conducted. The partitioning of carbon (C), N and P was measured from June 2003 to July 2004. Soil solution inorganic N and P results indicate that the system is strongly limited by N and, to a lesser extent by P. Results indicate that strong N-limitation and high concentrations of inorganic P compared to dissolved organic P moderate the release of phosphatases. Primary productivity is co-limited by N and P, while soil microbial biomass is limited by carbon. Plants and microbes compete for N, but not P, during the summer. Overall, there was a seasonal shift in the allocation of nutrients within the community, from a microbial dominated system in the winter to a plant-dominated system in the summer.

The Physical Object
Pagination166 leaves.
Number of Pages166
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19215559M
ISBN 100494024496

  Microbial Processes and Plant Nutrient Availability in Arctic soils. Introduction. Several characteristics of arctic soils influence microbial activity, nutrient mineralization, and nutrient availability to plants and will certainly figure prominently in changes in these processes in a warmer arctic climate. Microbial respiration and microbial C were significantly lower in grazed areas than in herbivore exclosures in both unfertilized and fertilized treatments, indicating that herbivores limit the C available for the soil microbes. Microbial N was significantly increased in the exclosures in the fertilized treatment, but there were no effects in the unfertilized by:

Serena M. Moseman, Opposite diel patterns of nitrogen fixation associated with salt marsh plant species (Spartina foliosa and Salicornia virginica) in southern California, Marine Ecology, 28, 2, (), ().   Nutrient enrichment, particularly nitrogen, is an important determinant of plant community productivity, diversity and invasibility in a wetland ecosystem. It may contribute to increasing Author: Nazim Uddin, Nazim Uddin, Randall William Robinson, Takashi Asaeda, Takashi Asaeda.

Salicornia virginica in a southern California salt marsh: seasonal patterns and a nutrient-enrichment experiment. – Wetlands – Britton, a J. et al. Interactive effects of nitrogen deposition and fire on plant and soil chemistry in an alpine heathland. – . - FORAGING GEESE, VEGETATION LOSS AND SOIL DEGRADATION IN AN ARCTIC SALT MARSH-9 Material and Methods Long-term changes in vegetation along permanent transects In spring permanent transects were established in the Puccinellia-Carex zone of the intertidal salt marshes at La Pérouse Bay, 4 in each of the western.


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Nutrient limitation and plant and soil microbial growth in an Arctic coastal salt marsh by Sarah K. Hargreaves Download PDF EPUB FB2

Nutrient Limitation and Plant and Soil Microbial Growth in an Arctic Coastal Salt : Sarah K. Hargreaves. The fertilization experiments indicated that both N and P limit plant growth in the salt marsh, although the system is closer to P saturation than to N saturation.

In contrast, plant growth in the freshwater marsh is constrained by phosphorus availability, with added nitrogen having little effect on plant by: In this study amounts of microbial biomass and the availability of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) for microbial and plant growth in wet peaty soils of an Arctic sedge meadow have been determined across the winter–spring by: Total amounts of calcium, magnesium and potassium in above-ground biomass per unit area showed similar differences in limitation.

3 Leaves of preferred forage species have higher nutrient concentrations (nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium, potassium, magnesium. Plant and microbial nitrogen (N) dynamics were examined in soils of an Arctic salt marsh beneath goose‐grazed swards and in degraded soils.

The degraded soils are the outcome of intensive destructive foraging by geese, which results in vegetation loss and near‐irreversible changes in soil by: 1 Plant and microbial nitrogen (N) dynamics were examined in soils of an Arctic salt marsh beneath goose-grazed swards and in degraded soils.

The degraded soils are the outcome of intensive destructive foraging by geese, which results in vegetation loss and near-irreversible changes in soil properties. The objective of the study was to determine. Hargreaves SK () Nutrient Limitation and Plant and Soil Microbial Growth in an Arctic Coastal Salt Marsh (Doctoral dissertation, University of Toronto).

Google Scholar Harpole WS, Ngai JT, Cleland EE, et al. () Nutrient colimitation of primary producer : Xue-mei Wang, Bang-guo Yan, Guang Zhao, Ji-xia Zhao, Liang-tao Shi, Gang-cai Liu. LETTER Soil microbial respiration in arctic soil does not acclimate to temperature Iain P.

Hartley,1* David W. Hopkins,1,2 Mark H. Garnett,3 Martin Sommerkorn4 and Philip A. Wookey1 1School of Biological and Environmental Sciences. 1 1 Soil microbial respiration in arctic soil does not acclimate to 2 temperature 3 4 5 Authors: 6 Iain P.

Hartley1,*, David W. Hopkins1,2, Mark H. Garnett3, Martin Sommerkorn4 and 7 Philip A. Wookey1 8 9 Affiliations: 10 1 School of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, 11 FK9 4LA, UK 12 13 2 Scottish Crop Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee, DD2 5DA, UK.

Coastal salt marshes play an important role in maintaining the balance of atmospheric carbon dioxide and serve as carbon sink with an estimated carbon Cited by:   Seasonal growth responses of plants and soil microorganisms to additions of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and carbon (C) were examined in goose-grazed and exclosed plots in an Arctic salt marsh.

Plants showed strong growth responses to N and NP additions but not to P. Nitrogen levels in the shoots and roots of Puccinellia phryganodes declined as summer by: 6. Such limitation is directly relevant for the fate of soil carbon and global element cycles, but its extent and nature have never been assessed systematically across the tropical biome.

Here, we address the relative importance of nitrogen, phosphorus, and other nutrients in limiting soil microbial biomass and process rates in tropical by: We computed the concentration of the available form of nutrients in salt marsh soil relative to Hoagland's nutrient solution.

Based on this ratio, plant nutrients in salt marshes were classified into four groups: osmotic adjustment group (Cl), potentially toxic group (Mg, B, S). Energy flows through an ecosystem in a one-way stream, from primary producers to various consumers.

Pyramids of energy show the relative amount of energy available at each trophic level of a food chain or food web.A pyramid of biomass illustrates the relative amount of living organic matter available at each trophic level in an ecosystem.

Microbial Competition in Polar Soils. Several reviews have highlighted the extent and importance of intermicrobial competition in natural environments [23,24], but few studies have characterized competition in polar environments, with only a handful examining competition among polar soil microorganisms (Table 1).A single gram of soil may contain thousands of microbial species [] as Cited by: growth and distribution of wetland plants.

Nutrients, especially for nitrogen, are highly dependent on soil moisture levels, and dry soil is usually concomitant with nutrient deficiency (Bonetto et al., ; Rejma´nkova´ et al., ).

Studies have shown that N and P levels limit species distribution in some wetlands (Verhoeven & Schmitz. Reassessing the nitrogen relations of Arctic plants: a mini‐review Arctic plant growth remains limited by the low levels of available soil nitrogen. However, Arctic plant growth is not limited by an inability to utilize any of the available forms of nitrogen.

ammonium and nitrate ions in the Arctic salt‐marsh grass, Puccinellia. Soil microbial communities in Arctic tundra, which are responsible for SOM decomposition, are as diverse as those found in other biomes (Neufeld and Mohn, ; Chu et al., ), despite the harsh environmental conditions.

Soil microbial diversity in Arctic tundra is likely to be driven by many environmental factors, including N by: Howarth, R.W. The ecological significance of sulfur in the energy dynamics of salt marsh and marine sediments.

dynamics in the Arctic: Integration of soil microbial and plant processes. Applied Soil Ecology 11 Microbial processes and plant nutrient availability in arctic. 8 Response of Plants to Elevated Atmospheric CO2: Root Growth, Mineral Nutrition, and Soil Carbon Hugo H.

Rogers, G. Brett Runion, Stephen A. Prior, and H. Allen Torbert I. CO2 Response The rise in atmospheric C02, due mainly to fossil fuel combustion and land use change, is an undisputed by:.

Seasonal partitioning of resource use and constraints on the growth of soil microbes and a forage grass in a grazed Arctic salt-marsh. SK Hargreaves, EJ Horrigan, RL Jefferies.

Plant and soil (), Nutrient Limitation of Plants and Soil Microbial Growth in an Arctic Coastal Salt Marsh. Nutrient Addition Dramatically Accelerates Microbial Community Succession Nitrogen and phosphorus limitation in a coastal barrier salt marsh: the implications for vegetation succession.

Journal of Ecology 87 () Soil bacterial growth and nutrient limitation along a chronosequence from a glacier forefield. Soil Biology of Biochemistry.The effect of nutrient deposition on bacterial communities in Arctic tundra soil microbes present in the soils. The combined data indicate that long-term fertilization resulted in a sig-nificant change in microbial community structure and function linked to changes in carbon and nitrogen availability and shifts in above-ground plant by: